12 May 2020
1:00 pm - 2:00 pm

Was Florence Nightingale a Feminist? Reading Cassandra

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by LSE Library
Free

Join us on the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth and Nurses Day to explore Cassandra, other feminist writings of her era.

About this Event

Before she became the “lady with the lamp”, 32-year-old Florence Nightingale penned a furious essay, transforming her despair about the forced idleness of upper-class Victorian women into a rebellious anger that fuelled her determination to undertake useful work. Written in 1852, just two years before Nightingale went to the Crimea, Cassandra was printed privately in 1860 but not published until 1928 and was republished by a feminist press in 1978.

Nightingale herself had an ambiguous reputation within the women’s movement as she refused to join the women’s suffrage campaign, yet her work and legacy was an inspiration to women who wanted a profession. Dr Anne Summers (Chair of the Friends of the Women’s Library and author of Angels and Citizens: British Women as Military Nurses 1854-1914) will briefly introduce Florence Nightingale and her work.

Join us on the 200th anniversary of Florence Nightingale’s birth and Nurses Day to explore Cassandra, other feminist writings of her era, and the collections of the Women’s Library and the Royal College of Nursing.

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When

12 May 2020
from 1:00 pm to 2:00 pm

Where

LSE Library: The British Library of Political and Economic Science
LSE Library: The British Library of Political and Economic Science, Portugal Street, London, UK

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Organiser

LSE Library: The British Library of Political and Economic Science

Phone

+44 (0)20 7405 7686

Email

library.enquiries@lse.ac.uk

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